Anterior (Cranial) Cruciate Ligament Extracapsular Repair

Our doctors routinely perform cranial cruciate (also called anterior cruciate) ligament repairs for dogs and cats. They use a technique known as extracapsular lateral suture stabilization which provides stability to the knee after an injury or rupture to the ligament. This procedure involves placing a heavy monofilament suture in a path similar to the ligament on the outside of the joint, which stabilizes the knee and allows fibrous tissue to heal and provide permanent stabilization.

Femoral Head Osteotomies

A femoral head osteotomy (FHO) is a surgical removal of the head and neck of the femur for treatment of traumatic or chronic conditions which effect the hip. Removal of the femoral head eliminates contact between the bone and the joint which alleviates pain caused by abnormal contact of the bones. Following the surgery, fibrous tissue and the muscles act as a false joint and support the area. Though the procedure does result in a slight shortening of the affected limb, most dogs are able to return to near normal activity after surgery.  

Medial or Lateral Patellar Luxation Corrections

Typically, the knee cap rides inside the femoral groove when the knee is flexed, however, when luxation occurs, the knee cap dislocates and rides outside of the groove. This can occur if the trochlear groove is not an adequate depth, if the tibial tuberosity is located too far to the inside or outside of the leg, or if the tissues on the inside or outside of the leg are too tight. Surgical repair of a luxating patella seeks to eliminate one or more of the causes of patellar instability through either deepening the groove (trochleoplasty), movement of the patellar ligament (tibial tuberosity transposition) or loosening the surrounding tissues (lateral imbrication or medial release). Patients with clinically significant lameness due to patellar luxation experience significant improvement following surgical intervention.

Fracture Repairs

Once a bone is broken, it must be immobilized for long enough to allow the bones to heal back together. For breaks in which a splint or cast is not an option, surgical repair of the fracture is often warranted. Our doctors can perform internal fixation of various fractures in dogs and cats, and can assist your pet on the road to recovery. There are many different options for treating fractures, and our doctors will help you to determine which is the best for your pet. 

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WHAT OUR
CLIENTS SAY

Convenient location and friendly staff who treats you and your pet like a life long friend. First impression couldn't have been better: our cat was having her kittens and despite the fact that we had never been there before they recognized the emergency at hand and were at the door waiting for us less than 5 minutes after I called to tell them the situation. They seem to stay very busy and the only complaint I've heard some people say is it's expensive. However, from my experience, if that's true it's not a deal breaker because it's nothing more than a few bucks compared to other vets on Southside

- Peter F

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Our Address

2749 McRae Rd.
Richmond, VA 23235

Hours

Mon - Fri: 8am to 7pm
Sat: 9am to 12noon

Doctor's Hours
Mon - Fri: 9am to 6pm
Sat: 9am to 12noon

Contact

Call: (804) 320-5991
Fax: (804) 320-3517